Amazon Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi, can the new Sony reader pose a challenge to the well established Kindle?

From many eReader comparisons, the Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi is a very interesting one. To understand why, you simply have to backtrack a few years ago.

 

Before Amazon came out with its market leading Kindle, there was Sony. The company was really the first one to pioneer the manufacturing and use of e-readers in the market, at least 14 months before Amazon’sKindle reader.

Users could download books and read them at their own pace, anywhere. However, for some reason, it failed to integrate one very important factor: Wireless connectivity.

Connectivity is something Kindle capitalized on, above everything else. With it, users discovered they no longer have to go through the lengthy process of connecting their e-reader to their PC or laptop, then downloading the titles, and transferring them to their e-reader. As long as there is Wi-Fi around, they can download titles and store copies in their own accounts.

Since then Amazon never looked back, monopolizing the market with its strings of Kindles that never failed to capture the attention and hard-earned dollars of their followers. Yet Sony is not taking a backseat either.

Perhaps it is just waiting for the right time, which is now, to release its upgrade. This time, its reader is fitted with Wi-Fi while retaining features that are so similar with Kindle its stiffest competitor.

Today you are going to find out how each of these e-readers fare in a lot of categories, then determine which one is a better fit for you. 

Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi: What Is Kindle?

Kindle Touch dimensions inches

So far, there 5 different Kindles, with Touch (picture on the right) in its pre-order stage and set to be released in November 2011. Out of all the five, though, Sony Reader Wi-Fi shares almost the same features with the first one.

Before we proceed with the Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi comparison, let us discuss the first Kindle. Released in November 2007, it measures 6.5 inches in length, 4.5 inches in width, and 0.34 inches in depth. It is the smallest Kindle with regards to screen size. It also weighs 5.98 ounces (170g), the lightest among the bunch.

It uses E Ink® Pearl display and possesses bottom controls used for navigation. It connects online via Wi-Fi and comes with a 2GB internal memory with no memory card slot. There are over 900,000 titles to download and 1.8 million available for free. You can also read blogs, magazines, and periodicals.

Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi: What is the Sony Reader Wi-Fi? To make Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi fair, we also have to give the spotlight to the latter. Sony Reader Wi-Fi measures 6.89 inches in length, 4.38 inches in width, and 0.38 inches in depth. It weighs 5.9 ounces (167g) and has a screen size of 6 inches.

It also uses E-ink Pearl technology with around 50 percent screen contrast, but it does not have any toggles because it is touch screen. With Wi-Fi on, the battery can last for at least a month while over 4 weeks if it is off. It comes with a 1.3GB internal memory, which can be expanded to 32GB through a microSD slot. You can also use a stylus for note taking and annotating. Sony offers around 2 million titles. 

Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi: What is the Sony Reader Wi-Fi?

Sony reader Wi Fi, Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi

To make Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi fair, we also have to give the spotlight to the latter. Sony Reader Wi-Fi measures 6.89 inches in length, 4.38 inches in width, and 0.38 inches in depth. It weighs 5.9 ounces (167g) and has a screen size of 6 inches.

It also uses E-ink Pearl technology with around 50 percent screen contrast, but it does not have any toggles because it is touch screen. With Wi-Fi on, the battery can last for at least a month while over 4 weeks if it is off.

It comes with a 1.3GB internal memory, which can be expanded to 32GB through a microSD slot. You can also use a stylus for note taking and annotating. Sony offers around 2 million titles. 

Kindle vs Sony Reader Wi-Fi: Comparison

Body

Obviously, Sony Reader Wi-Fi is much bigger than the Kindle, but the latter is much thinner, making it appear lighter and sleeker. In fact, it is almost as thin as a paperback. You will fall in love with the stunning touch screen and forget about the larger size of the Sony Reader.

The touch screen is not as comparable as that of tablet PCs especiallyApple iPad, but it is responsive enough. It also makes the e-reader look very clean and well organized.

Internal Storage

At first glance, the Sony E-reader wins the category. Although it only comes with a small storage capacity, it can be increased to 32GB through the memory card slot. As mentioned, Amazon’s Kindle doesn’t have expansion capabilities.

If you use up the space, you will have to delete some of the content. Nevertheless, 2GB is plenty of storage which can accommodate over 3,000 titles.

Before you even fill up the space, there will be a new Kindle available. Moreover, Amazon offers a cloud service that can provide you with unlimited storage for all your titles.

Connectivity

Both can connect using Wi-Fi. In the country, there are over 20,000 hotspots. If you are looking for 3G—which is faster, more secure, and more stable—you can just upgrade your Kindle to Keyboard or Kindle DX.

Readability

Both use the e-ink Pearl display technology. Pearl provides 50 percent contrast, which means texts and images should appear clearer even when you’re under direct sunlight.

They also have built-in dictionaries, though Sony Reader has more at 12, including 10 translation dictionaries. You can bookmark pages and annotate by using the virtual keyboard for Kindle and stylus or virtual keyboard for Sony Reader. When it comes to text styles, both e-readers give you the option to modify them; however, you have more choices with the Sony Reader, which has 8, than the Kindle which has 3.

Kindle gains an advantage in rotation. You can change the orientation of your screen from portrait to landscape, a function not found in the Sony E-reader Wi-Fi.

The Sony e-Reader supports the ePub format, the most common file format for texts, while Amazon’s Kindle doesn’t as it has a proprietary format. The good news is there are applications that convert ePUB documents to Kindle-friendly formats.

Price

At $126.99, Sony E-reader is a bit more expensive. The first Kindle only costs $109 without offers. Its nearest competition is Kindle Touch, sold at $139, but it already comes with special offers and 3G.

Eco-system

Kindle takes the lead with regards to ecosystem. You can download more apps with it, and share passages through popular sites such asFacebook and Twitter. E-reader doesn’t have this option.